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‘Rising seas’: The hidden history of sea life and the world’s oldest ship

A sea life expert has found that many of the oldest ships in the world are built on the shores of Scandinavia, which is often referred to as the “sea of life”.

Professor John Molyneux, an underwater archaeologist from the University of Oxford, believes that this is because the land on which the ships are built is home to marine life that has never been found on land.

Professor Molyieux told the BBC that when he started to dig around the edges of some of the Viking ship wrecks in Norway, he noticed that the hulls had a distinct seam on the bottom, which he says is indicative of the shape of a ship.

Professor John’s team, who also discovered the remains of a Viking shipwreck off the coast of Sweden, found a number of Viking ships dating back to around the 10th century. “

I thought it was because they were in a very stable way and they were not likely to move about very much.”

Professor John’s team, who also discovered the remains of a Viking shipwreck off the coast of Sweden, found a number of Viking ships dating back to around the 10th century.

According to Professor Molyemux, the ship hulls of the boats are typically made of metal, and they can be found in places as far away as Scandinavia.

They also found a few Viking ship wreck ships that were built in the 8th and 9th centuries.

The shipwreck site is located in the village of Lagervik in Norway’s north-west.

It is thought that the Viking ships were a regular practice of Viking sailors.

A Viking ship, found at the shipwreck in Lagerkvatnes, Norway, which dates back to the 10 th century.

Source: BBC News – http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/arts-nature/2115991.stm Professor Thomas Molyeneux said the Norse tradition of building ships on the coasts of Scandinavians, which are often referred by some to be the sea of life, is quite common.

He told the programme: “The Vikings were probably the first to do this and to get the idea of a large ship, and so they probably built ships out of steel, because the seas were very salty, and the seas would hold the salt water that would keep them from being too big.”

“So if you were to say a large, heavy ship, the hull of the ship would be made of steel and the hull would be much more sturdy than steel.”

The Vikings are thought to have built some of their most famous ships on Norwegian islands, but they are also known for their seafaring feats.

For example, one of the largest ships ever built was the Vangenevere, which weighed over 800 tonnes.

And, in the 12th century, the Viking fleet sailed across the Atlantic, across the Mediterranean and across the Red Sea.

In a previous BBC interview, Professor Monyneux said he believed there were around 40 Viking ships still in existence.

Although the Viking sailors would have been able to make use of many of these ships, he said the largest of them were still used in wars between Scandinavia and England.

As well as the Vikings, there are a number other cultures who used boats for seafaring.

Among them were the Norwegians and the Mongols.

One of the earliest boats was the Viking-built Yggdrasil, which was built around the same time as the Vadum-class Viking-class warship, and was also found at a site in Norway.